CIO Blogs for July 2011

CIO BlogsReinvent Your Training Methods by Chris Curran

Available does not equal best by Eric D. Brown

Transitioning IT from a technical focus to a business focus by IT BS Watch

How to Kill Projects and Develop Agile Programs Part 1 by Isaac Sacolick

Free Answers From Google On How CIOs Can Be Better Managers  by Jim Anderson

Aspiring To Be More…

I have a recent master’s graduate on my team who is aspiring to be more. His goal to eventually manage various IT projects outside his core competency which is development. He came to me the other day asking about how he can do more. I gave him the following advice to help him along.

1- Speak Well
The ability to speak to a wide variety of people is essential. Good eye contact, a varied vocabulary and the ability to tailor your language to suit your audience are essential. Practice talking with anyone and everyone you. Being more adept in social situations and being better equipped to network successfully will help you forge working relationships.

2- Confidence
Indecision–I hate it and I hate seeing it especially in the workplace. A good leader is decisive. If you are paralyzed by the fear of getting it wrong, you will end up doing nothing, which is worse than trying something and failing. Learn to evaluate different decisions for their pros and cons, and make decisions that will take you closer to completing a given task. The key is to make sure that your decisions are thought out and reasoned. Be confident in your judgment and believe in yourself to get things right.

3- Accept Responsibility
Accept responsibility, both for successes and failures. If you want other people to respect you, acknowledge your errors rather than trying to blame someone else. Everyone makes mistakes, but the real test is how you react to that. Being able to admit you have made a mistake is a sign of humility.

4- Be Positive
Be positive about work and life. A positive attitude is entirely self-determined and can be helped by accentuating the positives in any situation. Don’t see problems; see solutions.

5-Presentation
Learn how to present yourself to others. I cannot say enough about grooming. Take pride in your appearance. The way you look enhances the way you feel about yourself, making you more confident.

6- Be Organize
Learn to track projects, meet deadlines, and set schedules. Ideally, you will reach a stage when you can get ahead of the curve and start taking on additional projects and responsibilities.

 

 

CIO Blogs for January 2011

Better Communication: Technology Isn’t Always The Best Solution by Mike SchaffnerCIO Blogs

CIO as General Manager? by Mark Brewer

Can a CIO be successful without IT experience? Define your terms! by Peter Kretzman

Four Models for success for the CTO / CIO- CTOVision by Eric Brown

Why CIOs Need Management Power Maps To Get Anything Done by Jim Anderson

How To Cope When The Boss Is A Bully by Andy Blumenthal

CIO Blogs for December 2010

Lessons from Old Backups by Mark BrewerCIO Blogs

Wikileaks Positive Side Effect for IT by Mike Schaffner

Predictions 2011 by Peter Birley

Holy Grail of IT, Operating Expense vs Capital Investment by Oh I See (CIO Inverted)

One CIO’s “lessons learned” in managing others by Peter Kretzman

Which IT project comes first – Legacy or Sexy? by Eric Brown

500 Meetings a Day by John D. Halamka

3 Skills That Most CIOs Are Missing by Jim Anderson

CIO Blogs for November 2010

CIO BlogsCreating a vision by Don Lewis

One CIO’s “lessons learned” in managing others by Peter Kretzman

Is Project Management a skill or a technique? by Eric D. Brown

Selfishness and The Paradox of Emotional Intelligence by Andy Blumenthal

CIO Blogs for September 2010

Technology to the rescue! (or not) by Don LewisCIO Blogs

What’s wrong with today’s IT? by Eric D. Brown

Why IT Must Embrace Facebook, Twitter, iPhone by Mike Schaffner

Another variation for the CIO (Chief Imagination Officer) by Oh I See (CIO Inverted)

100 Days as CIO; A Retrospective by Isaac Sacolick

Why Do None Of The Other Kids Want To Play With The CIO? by Jim Anderson

The Orphaned CIO

“The orphaned CIO is a CIO without a leader.”         

Have you been in an organization where they do not know where to place the CIO? Organizationally management does not see the CIO as a leader but just the tech guy managing technology and spending money and all around just a cost center.

The hardest part is reporting to someone that does not see you as part their team and you are left to fend for yourself and your IT department. What is a CIO to do in situations like this?

Some CIOs will call it a day and move on to greener pastures. Others will stay and fight and prove that they are more than the technology they are responsible for. The challenge with this strategy is changing the culture of the organization.

Cultural change comes over time and at great risk. CIOs in these situations must work in small increments to make these changes over very long periods.  Above all they must know which battles to fight and which ones to let go.

It is through this methodology that the CIO will be accepted into the inner sanctum of the executive board room.